Everdure lump charcoal?

  • G'day all,

    In my quest to buy some lump charcoal at local Bunnings, I saw that they have the Everdure by Heston. This is not on their website, so it may be leaving their range?


    I've searched this forum but I haven't found any reviews on it yet.

    Has anyone used it? If so, what are your thoughts on it?


    At $62.95 for a 20kg bag it isn't cheap, but it's marginally better than the Char Griller lump at $32.95 for 10kg.

    Thanks for looking,

    Steve.

  • My concern with that is the price. How much extra are we paying just because it has Heston on the bag ?

    Big Green Egg - aSmoke Grill - Weber Kettle - Maximus Pizza Oven - Dragon Hibachi - Ziggy Portable - baby kamado - Cobb BBQ - Converted Gas Bottle Spit - Charbroil Grill2go - Anova sous vide - Digi Q controller

  • My concern with that is the price. How much extra are we paying just because it has Heston on the bag ?

    I'm sure that there is a 'celebrity endorsement fee' built in to the price :D .

    From what I hear on the grapevine, Everdure are still keeping charcoal in their range.

    I wonder if they'll part ways with the celeb chef or keep him on board (or bag in this case)?

  • I saw it when I was at big red shed last week and even though I am just about out of charcoal, decided to walk past it. No one here has ever mentioned it before and I was worried about the celebrity / name premium given I know that big red shed sell Heatbeads 20Kg charcoal for $56 (when it’s in stock). Figured it COULD be better, but 12%+ premium???

    WSM 18' Smoker (since Christmas 2019 = certified "L" Plater) / Everdure Cube / Gas 4 burner / Metters' Dover No. 7 Wood Stove

  • $60 for 20kgs is about the going rate at the moment. I’d give it a crack if that’s all that’s available where you are.

    weber performer, weber compact with gas conversion, napoleon rodeo, pro q 20", PBC, ziggy portable, ozpig with rotisserie, pro smoke offset, pit boss mini kamado, asmoke portable, master built 560.

  • Do they have Matador 10kg lump down your way? It’s $23. You could get some by ordering it by asking special orders to get some.

    We have the matador stuff, both lump and robot turds. I thought I saw a few reviews on here that weren't favourable tho?

  • I think in terms of quality for lump charcoal at Bunnings we have Jumbucks last, Matador, Chargriller and at the top Heat Beads, BUT it depends on what you are going to use it with and how you're going to cook with it.


    No single charcoal is good at everything. The smell is very subjective. It depends what you're used to.


    In the end, give the Matador a go and see if it is ok. Also keep in mind that Bunnings may have a storage problem at your local. At my local I think they use the bags for football practice as you need to check it to see what's happened to the contents since it was last drop kicked.

  • I would not worry about the quality of the Everdure charcoal supplied in Aus/NZ/US.

    Great to know. That particular big red hammer isn’t too far from me so I’ll grab some and hopefully that will tide me over until I can make the trip out to Mt Druitt

    WSM 18' Smoker (since Christmas 2019 = certified "L" Plater) / Everdure Cube / Gas 4 burner / Metters' Dover No. 7 Wood Stove

  • I think in terms of quality for lump charcoal at Bunnings we have Jumbucks last, Matador, Chargriller and at the top Heat Beads, BUT it depends on what you are going to use it with and how you're going to cook with it.


    No single charcoal is good at everything. The smell is very subjective. It depends what you're used to.


    In the end, give the Matador a go and see if it is ok. Also keep in mind that Bunnings may have a storage problem at your local. At my local I think they use the bags for football practice as you need to check it to see what's happened to the contents since it was last drop kicked.

    I'm looking mainly for charcoal to use for 'low n slow' in the kamado.

    To my thinking (quite possibly wrong here) but if the charcoal doesn't stink at lower temps, it won't at higher temps?

    The charcoal I have now (Chargriller) does smell a bit 'swampy', but none of the family made mention of it when I used it last. I have used mangrove charcoal before at low temps and it had a horrendous 'swampy' stench to it, which everyone commented on.

    I have a very sensitive nose though, so it could be just me ^^ .

  • Have you tried making a charcoal blend for your low and slow? eg mix some coconut charcoal?

    That way you can extend your normal/main charcoal


    Unfortunately mangrove has gotten a bad name. If you buy the good stuff from a reputable supplier you will have no problems. Lot's of restaurants/charcoal chook shops use mangrove.


    Unfortunately people have imported cheap rubbish and sub-standard crap made in Australia , eg sold in markets, backyards, gumtree etc. When it stinks up the bbq people say it's mangrove even though they have no clue what it really is. eg. A major Vietnamese supplier, the cheapest charcoal is eucalyptus not mangrove. People mistakenly blame bad lump from Vietnam as mangrove when it is actually eucalyptus.


    Looking after charcoal is key too. Charcoal is wonderful stuff to absorb whatever is around it. It is why it is used in filters. It's not very hard to turn good charcoal into smelly waste if you leave it in moist conditions. eg leave a bag of charcoal on the ground under the house in wet weather and your house has a rising damp problem.

    Edited once, last by 12x7 ().

  • To my thinking (quite possibly wrong here) but if the charcoal doesn't stink at lower temps, it won't at higher temps?

    I have been able to "put up with the smell" of some sub standard charcoal as it burns out the rubbish until it stabilised. Other times it is a complete failure and all I have done is stink out the neighbours as well as make the kamado a rival to a smoke stack of a coal fired power station.


    Also we have to remember how briquettes such as heat beads work. You cook when they get ashen white. Before then they're still getting rid of all the stink additives they use which goes into your food if you put it on too early.

  • Before then they're still getting rid of all the stink additives they use which goes into your food if you put it on too early.

    How does that work with the snake method?

    It might even depend on the type of briquette. Kingsford seems smellier to me (which is why I stopped using it).

    Maximus Pizza Oven | GMG - Daniel Boone | Fire Pit | Cyprus Grill | Big Steel Keg | Blackstone Griddle | Weber Genesis |

  • Also we have to remember how briquettes such as heat beads work. You cook when they get ashen white. Before then they're still getting rid of all the stink additives they use which goes into your food if you put it on too early.

    Use a coconut or sawdust charcoal, and you will avoid chemical additives. The only additive (check with vendor) in coconut charcoal is starch to hold the wet charcoal together during briquette compression/extrusion. Sawdust charcoal should have zero additives, as the briquettes are formed with wet sawdust before carbonisation.

  • From the head beads site


    How are Heat Beads® Original Briquettes made? – Heat Beads®
    Find out what goes into making Heat Beads® BBQ Briquettes. The high quality and composition of our briquettes makes cooking safe, easy and odourless.
    heatbeads.com.au


    HOW ARE HEAT BEADS® ORIGINAL BRIQUETTES MADE?

    The high, consistent quality of Heat Beads® Original BBQ Briquettes is due to the unique raw materials base used – a blend of natural hardwood charcoal and clean burning mineral carbon.

    The mineral carbon is known as char, a material that has been through a process at high temperatures to remove the volatile matter, leaving a high purity carbon. This material provides the long burn time that Heat Beads® briquettes are known for.

    The charcoal used are fines from the production of high quality hardwood lump charcoal, and would otherwise be waste.

    Heat Beads® Original BBQ Briquettes also contain a binder, an oxidising agent and a secret* ingredient. Each of these materials is naturally occurring, and has a very specific purpose.

    • A binder is used to hold the briquettes together in the traditional pillow shape. The binder used is food grade starch – a high quality material that is responsible for ensuring the briquettes are hard and don’t crumble.
    • An oxidising agent is used to make the briquettes easier to light. This material is a salt, often used as a food preservative. Without it, the briquettes would take a long time to light and require more firelighters.
    • A final, secret* ingredient is added to our BBQ Briquettes to provide a thermal mass to hold the heat generated by the carbon burning, helping ensure Heat Beads® BBQ Briquettes stay hotter for longer.
    • * This secret and magical ingredient is also known as ‘sand’.

    Australian Char then blends and presses (briquettes) the char, charcoal and starch, salt and sand into a superior barbecue fuel, tailored to the specific needs of the barbecuing public. Safe, non-toxic, odourless, and made in Victoria, Australia for over 40 years.



    This youtube is a great summary how KIngsford briquettes came about from the manufacture of model T cars by Ford.

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    Edited 2 times, last by 12x7 ().

  • How does that work with the snake method?

    It might even depend on the type of briquette. Kingsford seems smellier to me (which is why I stopped using it).

    The slow burn nature of the snake generates a low/small amount of smoke which is easily dissipated and blended into the surrounding air.

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