Posts by Gumb

    Got some spare ribs which, typical of the way they are cut in Australia, were pretty thin on top but did have some good meat in between the bones, particularly in the middle sections.


    Cooked on the BGE at 110c for about 2.5 hours.



    I slightly watered down some BBQ sauce, then warmed it up and added it to the ribs before tightly wrapping.



    Then back in the BGE for another 2 hours at around 130c.



    I let them rest for about half an hour in the foil before the unwrapping.


    They were falling off the bone when it was time to eat.



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    I did a low and slow cook on the Big Green Egg today with the TTT in control. It sat locked around my desired temp of about 110c for 2.5 hours while I went out and then it was time to wrap the ribs and foil and increase the temp. I opened the butterfly control a bit and it slowly increased the pit temp. As it did that, the TTT slowly closed again to a similar setting to what I had previously and the pit sat around the 130c for the next 2 hours. It all worked perfectly once again.


    The bottom vent was open about 15mm as before.


    This pic shows the position of the butterfly on the TTT during the whole cook. I'd increased the pit temp and foiled the ribs when I took this photo.




    Once the ribs were done I thought I'd try the maker's recommended method which involved shutting the bottom vent completely. After a while, the pit temp started dropping and the TTT had opened up to the fully open position, since it had was reacting to the lack of heat coming from the fire in the bottom of the egg.


    Here it is after about an hour, still some heat in the chamber but more likely due to the BGE being able to retain heat rather than the fire going well.



    Another hour went by and the fire had died. The BGE kept the heat in but the temp had gone down to 100c.


    In summary, as we thought, shutting the bottom vent completely is a bad move, particularly in a kamado like this one where the fire is a long way below the top event. How they market the TTT telling people to close the bottom vent is a mystery to me.


    The TTT is a brilliant idea and works exactly as intended. I highly recommend them as a control method at a very affordable price.

    Good work. Crackle is a secondary consideration and if the pork is good, that's what counts.


    Looking at the picture, the rind needs to be scored in thin strips and it's best if you pour boiling water over it and stick it in the fridge, uncovered overnight before rubbing in some salt and cooking the next day.

    For a better result, cook it at a lower temperature by using the snake method. A 2kg scotch can take up to 10-12 hours unwrapped or less if wrapped after it hits the stall, which is around 70c internal. In that case, and without a thermometer, I'd say cook for about 4 hours, wrap and cook for another 2. Then probe it with a wooden skewer and when you feel no resistance, it's done. Then, and this is important, rest it in the foil for at least an hour before opening.


    You are flying blind without a way to monitor temperature and they aren't expensive like this one on eBay for $20.....


    https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/IN…84ba9b:g:h2gAAOSwAvFcZQ3V

    Pork scotch is another name for pork neck and it works as well, if not a bit more forgiving, than pork shoulder when doing pulled pork.


    It looks like it's very close the the coals, how long did you cook it for and to what temperature ?

    This is one of the best videos I've seen which shows the butchering of the pork ribs. it also helps explain why we get very little meat on the top of ribs in Aus.


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    Here's a video of the trial run on the kettle.


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    My kettle only has the small tab on the top vent so the TTT just sits over it. I think you have the one as in this video, check around the 50sec mark to see how it should fit.


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    I thought the Bluetooth ones all used a phone app? :dunno:


    No, some do but it's the bluetooth which send the signal from the sending unit attached to the probes to the receiver unit which can be in the house. You don't need to use the receiver part if you don't need to, it's just part of the package.


    Others will bluetooth or wifi to the phone app, and not have a receiver unit, like the Inkbird for example.